Tuesday, 14 April 2020 19:50

    Yeast

    There's a baking frenzy at the moment and many people are making their own sourdough bread. I'm a fan of traditional yeasted breads and always use fresh yeast for my bread. I generally pick some up from the bakery department at the supermarket (just ask, they'll always give you a piece.)  Lot's of people have been asking me about the different types of yeast available; how to know what and how much to use in recipes. There are three main types but you bet your life that you will have a different type than specified in the recipe

    Fresh yeast which must be kept chilled, will store for a couple of weeks in the fridge and also freezes nicely. Fresh yeast needs to be activated in liquid with a little sugar in order to start the fermentation. If a recipe asks for active dried yeast and you only have fresh yeast then you must double the quantity. See below.

    Active dried yeast is a dried form of fresh yeast and will also need activating in the same way as fresh yeast. Active dried yeast does not need to be refrigerated.

    Instant or Quick dried yeast can be added directly to the dry ingredients in a recipe and does not need activating. It is best to check the manufacturers instructions if using this.

    Amount to use - 20g of fresh yeast = 10g of active dried = 5g of instant dried.                       

    1 tsp of Active dried yeast is 3.5g.

     

    Published in Home Made
    Thursday, 18 October 2012 18:43

    Our Great British Bake Off Dish of the Day

    Phil, our Great British Bake Off Dish of the Day came to suffolk foodie towers to make us afternoon tea. Here are his amazing jam "philled" doughnuts.  Made with Paul Hollywoods original recipe.

    doughnut

    Published in Dish of the Day
    Friday, 06 April 2012 11:57

    Hot Cross Buns

    Allow three hours to include rising time. Makes 16 buns.

    Ingredients

    1.5 tsp dried yeast

    5 fl oz warm milk

    1 oz caster sugar

    12 oz strong white flour

    1 tsp ground mixed spice

    1 tsp ground or grated cinnamon

    1 tsp ground or grated nutmeg

    1 teaspoon salt

    3 oz currants or mixed fruit – chopped a bit finer

    Grated zest of one lemon

    2 oz butter, diced

    1 egg, beaten

    1 tbsp flour and 1 tsp water mixed to form a paste - for the cross

    1 tbsp brown sugar and 1 tsp boiling water mixed - to glaze

    Method

    Stir together the warmed milk, the sugar and yeast in a small jug or bowl.

    Warm a large metal bowl gently for a few minutes on a low heat or in the oven, then put in the flour. Mix in the other dry ingredients – the spices, fruit, salt and lemon zest and rub in the butter.

    Create a well in the flour and add the milk mixture, then the beaten egg.  Mix the ingredients until well incorporated. Knead for ten minutes until a good smooth dough is formed. Cover with greased cling film or a clean damp cloth and leave until double in size (usually about two hours depending on room temperature)

    When risen knock back the dough and knead for a further two minutes. Cut into sixteen equal pieces and roll into bun shapes. Put on baking parchment on a metal baking sheet a few cm apart and cut a cross into the top with a sharp knife. Leave covered to double in size.

    Preheat oven to 375/190 Gas Mark 5. Just before cooking dribble the flour and water paste across the cut.  Cook in centre of oven for 15 – 20 minutes until the buns are golden brown. Remove from oven and glaze immediately with the sugar water glaze.

     

    Published in Recipes
    Friday, 04 February 2011 01:23

    Blinis

    You can't beat a delicious blini topped with smoked salmon and creme fraiche to perk up a cold February evening. We'll be making these as a canapes tomorrow night for little party. Here is our recipe.

     

    Published in Recipes